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©2019 by Wedding Media Productions

Professional Grade

Equipment

We take pride in providing the best possible equipment to ensure that the wedding videos are of  a quality that will last as permanent memories that you will look forward to viewing in the future.

Many hours are spent in researching the equipment that we use. Every effort is taken in maintenance and servicing to keep it in the best condition.

Sony PXW-FS5 XDCAM 4K

Super 35 Cinema Camera

As part of Sony's line of digital cinema cameras, the PXW-FS5 XDCAM Super 35 Cinema Camera System captures 4K UHD video using a Super 35mm-sized sensor for cinematic imagery. Though small in size, it incorporates professional features that differentiate it from consumer and DSLR/mirrorless cameras and make it suitable for use on productions as diverse as Event and Wedding Video, cinéma vérité-style documentaries, reality TV, and commercial and corporate applications.

Sony NEX EA 50

Professional NXCAM Camera

The NEX-EA50H is a professional NXCAM Camcorder with a large format Exmor™ APS-C HD CMOS sensor and interchangeable E-mount lens system providing exceptional creative freedom when shooting both Full HD movies and high-quality still photos. It is supplied with the newly developed SELP18200 18-200mm 11x Power Zoom E-mount lens providing auto focus, continuous variable iris and Optical Steady Shot™ image stabilization with Active Mode, making it ideal for shooting moving images. Film-makers can achieve a constant zoom speed and smooth slow zoom, both of which can be difficult to accomplish with manual zoom lenses. An innovative design with an extendible shoulder-pad allows you to switch between handheld and shoulder-mount operation as required, with no need for additional accessories.

Sony AX2000

HD-broadcast quality Camera

The Sony® HDR-AX2000 Handycam® camcorder delivers HD-broadcast-quality moving images with the convenience of a non-linear recording format. With 24p Progressive Scan Mode, the HDR-FX1000's high-quality motion lets you realise brilliant scene reproduction. CinemaTone Gamma™ and CinemaTone Colour™ provide the HDR-AX2000 with the colour and gamma range to give your footage an even more film-like feel

EW 112-p G3 Sennheiser

Bodypack transmitter and receiver

Fast, flexible and professional: these characteristics make the ew 112-p G3 the perfect fit for every ambitious reporting team seeking both portability and great sound quality. The nearly invisible clip-on omni-directional microphone transmits its signal via a bodypack transmitter with mute function and a portable, battery-powered adaptive-diversity receiver. The receiver and transmitter are lightweight and easy to operate, yet rugged and packed with features.

The Zhiyun Smooth 4 is a 3-axis hand-held gimbal designed for smartphones. Besides being able to stabilize and reduce shaky motion when shooting video, the gimbal offers quite a few useful features and tools.

Teamed with ProFiLMiC Pro the Zhiyun Smooth 4 is a Perfect Match for Mobile Filmmakers

The Zoom H4 is a handheld 4-track stereo digital recorder. It is ideal for recording interviews, lectures, podcasts, live performances, meetings, and classes. The unit has two built-in condenser microphones in an X/Y pattern for true stereo recordings. It also has two XLR/Phone combo jacks with phantom power, which allow you to connect the microphone or instrument of your choice. The H4 can record high-quality digital sound at up to 24-bit/96 kHz.

The Audio Technica AT875 is a short shotgun condenser microphone that measures only seven inches in length and exhibits the sound quality and performance of larger, higher-priced shotgun microphones. The AT875 addresses the needs of videographers who prefer a short microphone that stays out of the frame, and efficiently rejects off-axis noise.

Final Cut Pro X

Wedding Video Production Software

Much has already been written about Final Cut Pro X and its radical approach to video editing. Out went the track-based editing that characterises other non-linear editing systems in favour of the freestyle approach of the magnetic timeline. The old organisational structure of folders (or “bins” in video editing parlance) was superseded by a slick use of metadata, including keywords and ratings. Skimming allowed us to review our footage faster than ever before and editing tools were streamlined. Innovative functions such as clip connections, storylines, auditions and content-based auto analysis (for face detection, colour balance and audio problems) were introduced.

Apple MacPro

Workstation

Standing at just 25 cm tall and weighing 5kg, the Mac Pro’s design, beautiful as it may be, completely redefines Apple’s ultimate Pro machine. It comes with the same amount of internal flash storage as a laptop and no available PCI slots for video capture cards, RAID cards, or the like. The new Mac Pro is really meant to be configured at the time of purchase, with any additional storage or cards added externally through the six Thunderbolt 2 ports or four USB 3.0 ports. The new Mac Pro also comes with dual gigabit ethernet ports and 802.11AC wireless networking.

Multi Camera setups

Studio, Theatre and Concerts

We are experienced with many different camera set up suitable for Interviews, Concerts, Panel discussions and Theatre layouts as well as a complete portable studio that includes lighting, external audio equipment and multiple cameras. We are equipped for both outdoor and indoor filming. We are fully insured for public liability with Aon Insurance.

Manfrotto Tripod

290 XTRA Kit with video head

Standing at just 25 cm tall and weighing 5kg, the Mac Pro’s design, beautiful as it may be, completely redefines Apple’s ultimate Pro machine. It comes with the same amount of internal flash storage as a laptop and no available PCI slots for video capture cards, RAID cards, or the like. The new Mac Pro is really meant to be configured at the time of purchase, with any additional storage or cards added externally through the six Thunderbolt 2 ports or four USB 3.0 ports. The new Mac Pro also comes with dual gigabit ethernet ports and 802.11AC wireless networking.

 

Sony PXW-FS5 XDCAM

PXW-FS5 XDCAM Super 35

As part of Sony's line of digital cinema cameras, the PXW-FS5 XDCAM Super 35 Cinema Camera System captures 4K UHD video using a Super 35mm-sized sensor for cinematic imagery. Though small in size, it incorporates professional features that differentiate it from consumer and DSLR/mirrorless cameras and make it suitable for use on productions as diverse as Event and Wedding Video, cinéma vérité-style documentaries, reality TV, and commercial and corporate applications.

 

The camera's E-mount is machined from stainless steel and allows you to use E-mount lenses or accept most 35mm lenses with the use of adapters, including PL, EF, Leica, and Nikon lenses. The camera records in your choice of XAVC-L or AVCHD. It incorporates two SD media card slots that support simultaneous or relay recording. Outputs include both HDMI and SDI and Sony's proprietary Multi-Terminal. The body also incorporates an Ethernet connector, headphone jack, and XLR audio inputs. All connectors and card slots are covered to protect from dust incursion. The camera supports Wi-Fi and NFC functionality, allowing you live stream from the camera, or control it from a wireless device.

 

 

Camera

The 4K Super 35 EXMOR sensor features approximately 14 stops of latitude and a wide colour gamut. It offers a choice of XAVC or AVCHD codecs. The XAVC codec can be used for 4K and HD recording, while MPEG-2 is limited to HD recording. The XAVC Long allows you to encode from HD to UHD using Intra-Frame or Long GoP compression with 10-bit 422 for HD and 8-bit 420 for UHD.

 

The PXW-FS5 is equipped with an E-mount machined from solid stainless steel for stability and strength. It accepts E-mount lenses from Sony, Zeiss, and other manufacturers. The shallow flange distance allows you to mount most 35mm lens types, such as PL, DSLR, and legacy SLR lenses, including Canon EF, Leica, and Nikon as well as many others with mechanical adapters.

 

The camera includes an ergonomic handgrip that Sony calls a SmartGrip, which features Zoom, Start/Stop and Assign controls. The SmartGrip facilitates camera operation with the right hand, leaving the left hand free to operate the lens. The handgrip can be positioned at different angles permitting greater flexibility.

 

The camera features two SD media slots that support simultaneous or relay recording. One of the two SD slots also accepts Memory Stick-type media.

All input, output connectors feature covers for dust protection; this applies even to the DC input and LANC connector. The media card slots and Multi-Terminal are likewise protected from dust by a swing away door.

 

The camera includes a removable top handle that incorporates a second XLR 3-pin audio input that compliments the 3-pin XLR input incorporated into the body. Both audio inputs feature a selector switch for line/mic/mic+48.

 

The top handle allows you to attach the LCD viewfinder to the camera, providing you with a choice of using the camera's built-in EVF, or a larger LCD viewscreen. Audio level control is on the main body of the camera and offers automatic gain control.

 

A built-in, electronic, variable ND system allows you to dial in anywhere from 1/4 to 1/128th ND filtration in the camera body, allowing you to eschew the use of optical ND filters. The variable ND also features four preset positions; off, 1/4, 1/16, and 1/64.

 

An SDI connector provides HD 10-bit 422 output. In addition, one A-type HDMI 2.0 provides 4K and HD output. Both the SDI and HDMI ports can output REC trigger and TC following Sony's established transmission method.

 

The PXW-FS5 records to XAVC-L QFHD 8-bit 420 (up to 30fps) and HD 10-bit 422 (up to 60fps) internally.

 

The PXW-FS5 has Simultaneous-Recording capability with Individual Rec Trigger. Mirror or back-up recording is possible. There are two Rec s/s buttons: one on the camera grip, the other on the camera handle. The target SD card slot for each trigger is assigned in the Recording Menu.

 

The PXX-FS5 is capable of simultaneously recording proxy files with the same name and time code as the main recordings.

 

The camera has a built in Wi-Fi capabilities that enables live streaming to PCs, tablets, and smart phones. When using content Browser mobile, the user can even control the camera wirelessly. 

 

An Ethernet connector located on the rear panel of the camera provides robust connections when a reliable Wi-Fi link is not available.

Sony PXW-FS5 XDCAM

Sony NEX EA 50

  • Full HD recording

Sony PXW-FS5 XDCAM

Sony AX2000

  • The Sony® HDR-AX2000 Handycam® camcorder delivers HD-broadcast-quality moving images with the convenience of a non-linear recording format. With 24p Progressive Scan Mode, the HDR-FX1000's high-quality motion lets you realize brilliant scene reproduction. CinemaTone Gamma™ and CinemaTone Colour™ provide the HDR-AX2000 with the colour and gamma range to give your footage an even more film-like feel.
     

  • Detailed Features 
    The Sony® HDR-AX2000 Handycam® camcorder delivers HD broadcast-quality moving images with the convenience of a non-linear recording format. With 24p Progressive Recording Mode, the HDR-AX2000's high-quality film-like motion lets you realise brilliant scene reproduction. CinemaTone Gamma™ and CinemaTone Color™ provide the HDR-AX2000 with the colour and gamma range to give your footage an even more film-like feel. Three 1/3" ClearVid™ CMOS image sensors with Exmor™ derived technology capture sharp, detailed images even in lower-light (1.5 LUX) situations. The 29.5mm Wide-Angle to 590mm Telephoto G-Lens allows for wider angle shooting and brings the action closer (20x Optical). Three built-in neutral density filters and three manual rings provide even more flexibility.

     

  • Film-like Progressive Recording 24p/30p
    In addition to 1080/60i recording, the HDR-AX2000 offers a 1080/24p and 1080/30p Progressive Scan mode that enables shooting with film-like results. Signals scanned at 24p/30p are converted to 60i (using 2-3 pulldown for 24p) and recorded on MemoryStick PRO Duo™ media.

     

  • Up to 24Mbps AVCHD video
    The HDR-AX2000 can capture video at up to 24Mbps for amazing clarity and detail, ideal for recording on to Blu-ray® media since the AVCHD2 codec is highly compatible with the Blu-ray format.

     

  • Superior low-light (1.5 LUX) shooting capabilities
    Superior low-light ability with high sensitivity enables clear shooting of subjects in light as low as 1.5 lux (at 1/30 fixed shutter speed with auto iris and auto gain). This allows you to capture sharp detail and brilliant colours even in less than perfect lighting, especially when professional lighting cannot be used.

     

  • 3x 1/3" Exmor™ 3CMOS Sensors

  • The HDR-AX2000 features three 1/3” Exmor™ 3CMOS Sensors , each having 1,120K total pixels. The 3 independent CMOS sensors each handle one of the colour elements – red, green, blue (RGB) – improving the color reproduction of video recordings. Dark scenes can be captured with low noise thanks to ExmorTM technology that features a new column A/D converter and dual noise reduction. Sensor resolution has been optimised and the photosensitive surface area has been maximised thanks to the unique grid arrangement of the photo diode sensors, in which each is rotated by 45 degrees. This model also features the signal processing circuit, the Enhanced Imaging Processor (EIP) which uses Sony's unique image-processing technology.
     

  • Dual XLR Professional Audio Inputs
    Professional quality video requires professional quality audio. Featuring dual XLR 3-pin audio jacks, you will be able to provide +48V phantom power to external microphones. Additionally, the grounded connection allows insertion/removal of connectors in live equipment without picking up external signals.

     

  • Wide Angle G-Lens: 29.5mm Wide to 590mm (20x) Telephoto
    The HDR-AX2000 is equipped with a 29.5mm wide-angle “G Lens” made from advanced 10 group, 15 element lens including “Extra-low Dispersion glass” which reduces chromatic aberration caused by light refraction, and produces video with extremely low colour fringing. Designed for shooting situations ranging from broad landscape shots to conditions where sufficient distance from the subject is difficult to obtain. The 20x optical zoom (29.5mm-590mm: 35mm conversion) lets you zoom in to the subjects you can't get close to. The optical zoom takes maximum advantage of the lens performance, so image quality does not suffer even at a zoom ratio of 20x, allowing you to faithfully reproduce the subject's impact. The digital extender increases zoom by 1.5 throughout the range up to 30x at full zoom.

     

  • Optical SteadyShot™ image stabilisation w/ Active Mode
    Optical SteadyShot™ image stabilisation with Active Mode improves on existing Optical SteadyShot image stabilisation by allowing the camera lens to shift over a greater range of motion allowing the camera to compensate for greater degrees of camera shake and deliver a stunning level of image smoothness.

     

  • CinemaTone Gamma and CinemaTone Color control
    For extra control over image expression, Cinematone GammaTM technology is used to deepen the colour and Cinematone Colour to recreate film-like colour tones. Cinematone Gamma also allows operators to quickly set up and load a gamma curve with similar contrast characteristics to a film gamma curve.

     

  • 3x built-in neutral density (ND) filters
    Gain more color control in extreme settings with three built-in ND filters for adjusting the amount of light entering the Image Sensor through the lens. Depending on shooting conditions, the operator can chose from Clear, 1/4, 1/16, or 1/64 filters. In strong, glaring sunlight these filters give users more flexibility in choosing the shutter speed and aperture for superior creative control.

     

  • 3x manual rings for superior control: zoom, focus, and iris
    The HDR-AX2000 has three independent manual rings (zoom, focus, and IRIS ) for superior control and flexibility while filming which make it easier to promptly make adjustments to meet shooting needs. The IRIS ring allows you to adjust the aperture to attain optimal brightness and express beautiful depth of field shots, highlighting a subject while blurring a foreground or background. Exposure can also be assigned to the IRIS ring enabling the camera to automatically select the optimal iris, gain or shutter speed, seamlessly enabling adjustment of exposure.

     

  • 3.2" Xtra Fine LCD™ display1 (921k pixels)
    The 3.2” Wide1 (16:9) Touch Panel Xtra Fine™ LCD screen displays sharp, bright, vivid images, letting you compose a shot more easily -- even outdoors, while enabling you to change settings to best represent the scene. With 921K pixels resolution and a wide viewing angle, the XtraFine LCD™ screen is like having a HDTV built into your camcorder.

     

  • Enhanced Imaging Processor (EIP) Technology
    The EIP processor is able to rapidly process the vast amounts of pixel data read from the "3 ClearVid CMOS Sensor", and record beautiful HD and colourful video. The ClearVid CMOS Sensor™ has been developed using the most advanced technologies in the semiconductor industry. It handles video data in 1920 x 1080p and 4:2:2 color space for high-quality signal processing before recording it to MemoryStick PRO Duo™ media. Combined use of the EIP and 3 ClearVid CMOS Sensor imaging system allows the HDR-AX2000 camcorder to provide extremely high image quality with a smooth gradation and detailed image reproduction

     

  • Manual Gain/Shutter/White Balance Adjustment
    The ability to manually adjust gain, shutter speed, and white balance makes it possible to fine-tune the HDR-AX2000 model’s settings for near-professional operability and advanced image expression.

     

  • Minus Auto Gain Control (Minus AGC)
    When shooting in overly bright conditions, this feature enables the selection of gain settings in the negative range for satisfying results with minimal noise.

     

  • Assignable Buttons
    This feature allows you to assign features you use often to shortcut buttons. The commonly used features can be used quickly without going through a menu selection (default: Zebra, AE Shift, and Record Review). Features that can be assigned: Extended Focus / Digital Extender (30x) / Ring Rotate/ AE Shift / Index Mark / SteadyShot / Back Light / Spotlight / Fader / Smooth Slow Rec / Colour Bar / Rec Review / End Search / Zebra / Marker / Peaking / Pict. Profile / Shot Transition.

     

  • Additional record and zoom lever control on handle
    A record start/stop button is featured on the handle as well as on the side grip. The zoom lever enables easy zooming even when shooting from a low angle.

     

  • Improved Noise Reduction (w/ Exmor™ col. A/D conversion)
    Exmor™ technology captures video with high resolution, high sensitivity, and exceptional detail. Advanced on-sensor A/D conversion and dual noise reduction yields rich tonal reproduction with high signal-to-noise ratio.

     

  • 0.45"Xtra Fine View Finder
    This camcorder features a high-resolution 0.45” Xtra Fine (1,227K pixels) View Finder1 that offers extra clear visibility.

     

  • HDMI™ Connection2
    HDMI™ connectivity2 provides a simple, high-quality video and audio connection, with the ability to transmit HD video from the camcorder to compatible HDTVs via a single cable.

     

  • Dual Media Slots
    Capture still images directly onto one of two selectable Memory Stick PRO Duo™ media or SD/SDHC mediaslots for easy transfer to PCs for emailing, printing, or sharing with other compatible Memory Stick® devices (sold separately).

     

  • Multi-Language Menu
    Change the menu display from English to English (Simplified), Canadian French, Latin American Spanish, or Brazilian Portuguese

     

  • Picture Profile (up to 6)
    Allows the user to set manual adjustments for a scene (colour, sharpness, white balance, etc) into any one of 6 customisable presets, so they can be called up at just the touch of a button. This is useful when shooting under the same conditions repeatedly, as options do not have to be re-set each time. 4 settings for various shooting conditions are offered as defaults – portrait/ cinema/ sunset/ monotone.

     

  • x.v. Color™ Technology
    x.v.Color™ technology can capture or display nearly twice as many (1.8x) viewable colours than possible with the traditional RGB colour standard. This provides a more accurate and vivid colour range, for a more natural, lifelike overall experience.

     

  • Zebra display
    While you are shooting, you can add a striped pattern to bright areas of the video image, and display it in the LCD and viewfinder. You can use this as a rough guide for adjusting brightness, helping to prevent blocked highlights.

     

  • Peaking
    This feature emphasises the screen's edge in the LCD and viewfinder, making it easier to adjust the focus. You can change the peaking colour to white, red, or yellow according to the color of the subject, and you can also set the peaking level to high, medium, or low. This feature is handy when shooting with manual focus, because it makes it easy to tell where the focus is currently.

     

  • Centre Marker/Guide-frame
    The LCD and viewfinder feature a Centre Marker that lets users identify the centre of the screen at a glance. Users can also display a Guide-frame grid on the screen that simplifies the vertical and horizontal alignment of shots.

     

  • Colour Bar
    Four types of Colour Bars are available for use. These are convenient for colour adjustment when playing back images on a TV or monitor.

     

  • Fader
    To enhance viewing enjoyment, users can create transitions between scenes by using the White fader or Black fader to fade images in and out.

EW 112-p G3 Sennheiser Sound Equipment

  • Microphone Description
    The ME 4 clip-on cardioid microphone compliments this ENG set by blocking out extraneous background noise due to its high-directivity. The bodypack transmitter and portable adaptive diversity receiver are equipped with charging contacts built-in to the housing for use with Sennheiser's optional rechargeable batteries. Reception stays strong as the receiver is upgraded to utilise its line cable as a second antenna for adaptive-diversity operation.

  • Transmitter and receiver Description
    Fast, flexible and professional: these characteristics make the ew 112-p G3 the perfect fit for every ambitious reporting team seeking both portability and great sound quality. The nearly invisible clip-on omni-directional microphone transmits its signal via a bodypack transmitter with mute function and a portable, battery-powered adaptive-diversity receiver. The receiver and transmitter are lightweight and easy to operate, yet rugged and packed with features.

  • Features

  • Sturdy metal housing (transmitter and receiver)

  • 42 MHz bandwidth: 1680 tunable UHF frequencies for interference-free reception

  • Enhanced frequency bank system with up to 12 compatible frequencies

  • Adaptive-diversity reception for high reception quality

  • Pilot tone squelch for eliminating RF interference when transmitter is turned off

  • Automatic frequency scan feature searches for available frequencies

  • Enhanced AF frequency range

  • Increased range for audio sensitivity

  • Wireless synchronisation of transmitters via infrared interface

  • User-friendly menu operation with more control options

  • Illuminated graphic display (transmitter and receiver)

  • Auto-Lock function avoids accidental changing of settings

  • HDX compander for crystal-clear sound

  • Transmitter and receiver feature battery indication in 4 steps

  • Programmable Mute function

Sony PXW-FS5 XDCAM

Sony NEX EA 50

  • Full HD recording
    Full 1920 x 1080 AVCHD 2.0 Recording with 60/50Hz selection (50p/25p/50i or 60p/30p/24p/60i) NOTE: * *60p/i means 59.94p/i. 30p and 24p mean 29.97p and 23.98p, respectively.

  • Large Format Sensor for creative expression
    Large Format APS-C HD CMOS Sensor for high quality, creative moving images and shallow depth of field control. The large format Exmor APS HD CMOS sensor gives the user creative freedom when shooting Full HD movies and high-quality still photos.

  • Unique design for versatile shooting options
    The unique design of the NEX-EA50H further adds to the camcorder’s versatility. When the shoulder pad is extended, the camcorder can be balanced on the shoulder giving added stability for longer shooting times. Alternatively, when the shoulder pad is returned to its original position, the camcorder becomes compact enough to use in various handheld styles, allowing users to capture a wide variety of shots.

  • Interchangeable E-mount lens System
    The NEX-EA50H incorporates the Sony E-mount interchangeable lens system, which enables auto focus, auto exposure and stabilisation during shooting. With its short flange back distance, it is possible to attach both established A-mount lenses via the LA-EA2 lens mount adapter, and an unrivalled choice of other brands lenses using third-party adapters.

  • Newly developed powered zoom lens
    The NEX-EA50H camcorder comes with the newly developed Power Zoom E-mount lens E PZ 18-200mm F3.5-6.3 OSS SELP18200. It features auto focus, continuous variable iris and Optical Steady Shot image stabilisation with Active Mode, making it ideal for shooting moving images. It is electronically controlled by both the zoom rocker lever on the camcorder grip and top handle. Film-makers can achieve a constant zoom speed and smooth, slow zoom, both of which can be difficult to accomplish with manual zoom lenses. In addition, using fixed focal length lenses users can simulate a zoom effect using the smart digital zoom function, ensuring fast-paced shots are never missed.

  • Part of the professional NXCAM camcorder range
    The NEX-EA50H features a range of professional functions usually associated with NXCAM camcorders, such as 2-channel XLR audio, Linear PCM audio, time code, user bit and built-in GPS

  • 16.1 megapixel still image capture
    The camcorder can capture 16.1 megapixel still pictures with JPEG format support only. In addition, the NEX-EA50H has a built-in mechanical shutter to eliminate shutter-induced blur during long exposures while capturing still pictures.

  • A variety of recording media options
    Sony’s HXR-FMU128 flash memory unit docks directly to the camcorder for recording an immediate backup. The camcorder is compatible with the new Mirroring Memory Stick (MS-PX64/32/16) which is the world’s first memory card featuring a “Mirroring” function. This enables the card to deliver high reliability and data security through a dual recording (mirroring) function. This new professional memory card will be available in 3 different capacities: 16GB; 32GB and 64GB.

 
 
 
 

Sony PXW-FS5 XDCAM

Zoom H4 Stereo Field recorder:

  • The Zoom H4 is a handheld 4-track stereo digital recorder. It is ideal for recording interviews, lectures, podcasts, live performances, meetings, and classes. The unit has two built-in condenser microphones in an X/Y pattern for true stereo recordings. It also has two XLR/Phone combo jacks with phantom power, which allow you to connect the microphone or instrument of your choice. The H4 can record high-quality digital sound at up to 24-bit/96 kHz.


    The H4 records to Secure Digital (SD) Media (128MB included) in either WAV or MP3 formats. The H4 can record up to 34 hours on a 2GB SD Card in MP3 stereo mode. The unit also has several built-in studio effects, such as compression, limiting and mic modeling, as well as guitar and bass amplifier modeling effects.


    Able to record continuously for up to four hours on just two AA batteries, the H4 also sports a USB port for easy transfer of your audio to a PC or Mac. This also allows the H4 to act as a USB interface. Simply plug your mic into the H4, and plug the H4 into your computer via the included cable and record directly to your hard drive. The H4 comes bundled with Cubase LE, for easy editing of your recordings.


    All of these features packed into one palm-sized unit make the H4 ideal for journalists, "on-the-go" musicians, and students who need to archive every word out of the professor's mouth.


    Note! In order to ensure compatibility with Windows Vista and Mac OSX Leopard, and the highest capacity SD cards, please visit www.zoom.co.jp and make sure you have the latest firmware for your H4.


    Palm-Sized Unit
    The Small Form Factor Allows You to Take the H4 Anywhere
    Four-Track Recording
    Record Multiple Tracks, such as Vocal, Guitar, and Bass, Simultaneously
    High-Quality Audio
    With the Ability to Record WAV at up to 24-bit/96 kHz and MP3 at up to 320kbps, You Never Have to Stand for Sub-Par Audio
    Stereo Recording with Built-In Microphones
    The X/Y Pattern of the Microphones Provides True Stereo Recording
    Two Microphone Inputs
    The Combination XLR-1/4" Phone Jacks with Phantom Power Allow You to Use the Mic of Your Choice
    Built-In Effects
    Compression, Limiting, Mic Modeling and Guitar Amp Modeling.

Sony PXW-FS5 XDCAM

Audio-Technica AT875 Shotgun Microphone

  • The Audio Technica AT875 is a short shotgun condenser microphone that measures only seven inches in length and exhibits the sound quality and performance of larger, higher-priced shotgun microphones. The AT875 addresses the needs of videographers who prefer a short microphone that stays out of the frame, and efficiently rejects off-axis noise.


    The smooth, natural audio reproduction captures every detail while a tailored low frequency response controls unwanted low frequency noise. The rugged AT875 operates on 11 to 52V phantom power, and a standard XLR output integrates seamlessly with some of the smaller professional cameras.


    Short Length
    The AT875 measures only seven inches in length and is an ideal choice for use with small video cameras.
    Excellent Audio Rejection
    Excellent off-axis audio rejection provides greater range and excellent fidelity in noisy environments.
    Smooth Audio Reproduction
    The AT875 captures nuances and detail with great accuracy.
    Phantom Powered
    The microphone is powered with 11 to 52V phantom power.
    Tailored Low Frequency Response
    Camera noise, mechanical noise and handling noise is controlled and results better sound quality.

Sony PXW-FS5 XDCAM

Final Cut Pro X

  • Apple Final Cut Pro X

  • Michael Muchmore May 03, 2018

  • Apple's professional and prosumer-level video editing software, Final Cut Pro X, treads a fine line between consumers who want more power for their video-editing projects than iMovie offers and professionals who create content for movies and TV. It does a remarkable job of bridging these two worlds, and though professionals may complain about its nontraditional trackless timeline and amateurs may scratch their heads over its wealth of sophisticated options, it turns out to be a magnificent tool for both. Final Cut Pro X is an Editors' Choice for professional video editing software.

  • What's New in This Version?

  • The application has long since regained initially missing pro-level features—including multicam editing, XML importing, and external monitor support. Those have been joined by many new capabilities, including powerful 3D titling and an impressive Flow transition to smooth out jump cuts. New for Version 10.4 are rich support for 360-degree VR content, updated color grading tools, and support for HDR and HEVC (High Efficiency Video Codec, aka H.265). Those are the big ones, but there's also a slew of smaller tweaks and added capabilities.

  • Final Cut Pro X still shuns the traditional timeline-track interface of its predecessors, a change that drove off a lot of video professionals. The company did this to take advantage of the more powerful hardware in newer Macs as well as to reimagine the craft of video editing. The result is a surprisingly powerful and (once you get the hang of it) easy-to-use application.
     

  • Despite rumors of the pro video-editing industry moving away from Final Cut Pro X to Adobe Premiere Pro, Final Cut now has over 2 million users, making it more popular than ever, and some top-level editors have adopted the new Final Cut, too. The beautiful video for Bieber-assisted Latin blockbuster Despacito (the most watched music video of all time, with over 4.5 billion views) was cut in, you guessed it, Final Cut Pro X. Jan Kovac, the editor of Whiskey Tango Foxtrot has put out a video explaining why he loves it. An impressive example of work cut in the editor is Vimeo Best of the Year short video, Leonardo Dalessandri's Watchtower of Turkey. These and other editors have noted how innovations like Magnetic Timeline, Clip Connections, and Auditions (not to mention faster performance that takes advantage of modern CPUs) can make their jobs easier.
     

  • Pricing and Setup

  • As with any modern Mac app, Final Cut Pro X is obtainable only through the Apple App Store. You can install it on multiple Macs for $299, and you receive updates automatically. There's no updgrade pricing, but really, compared with the old Final Cut's $999 price, $299 is basically upgrade pricing. By comparison, you can only get Adobe's competing Premiere Pro with a Creative Cloud subscription for $19.99 per month. Once you've bought Final Cut Pro X, you're entitled to all updates, including to the present version, 10.4.

  • At over 3GB, Final Cut Pro X is a hefty download, so make sure you've got enough local storage. The program requires at least a Core 2 Duo-based machine running macOS Sierra 10.12.4 or later, an OpenCL-capable video processor, 4.15GB free disk space, and a minimum of 4GB RAM (8GB is the recommended amount).

  • I tested Final Cut on a 27-inch iMac with a 4.2GHz Core i7 CPU, 32GB RAM and a 5K Retina display and on a 13-inch MacBook Pro with at 3.1 GHz Core i5 CPU and 8GB RAM and Touch Bar. As you might expect with the iMac's specs, performance was responsive whether I was importing, scrubbing, previewing compound picture-in-picture montages, or adding effects.

  • Libraries, Import, Organize

  • Final Cut Pro X Libraries let you keep assets together for use in multiple projects. They combine the previously discrete Events and Projects panels. Libraries are similar to the Catalogs in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom in that they are databases that can be backed up to a separate drive, and they receive automatic backups. Luckily, you don't have to worry about projects you created before this Library arrangement: Final Cut offers a simple update option to get them with the program.
     

  • Libraries are a big part of organizing your assets, but before you use them you have to import media. In fact, at import, you can tell Final Cut to copy the media to a specified Library. Within the Library, the import is an Event. At import you can specify creating proxy and optimized media, and also analyze video for balance color and fix audio problems on import. Helpfully, clicking on a filename shows a large preview of its contents in the import dialog.

  • The program supports expanded color spaces like those approaching Rec. 2020, such as the DCI-P3 color space supported by current iPhones and iMacs. And with the latest version, it now supports the H.265 codec, designed to reduce files size of 4K and 360-degree footage.

  • Apple recently developed a format called ProRes Raw, which is analgous to Adobe's DNG raw still camera file format. It gives you access to all sensor data, meaning far more leeway in adjusting lighting and colors. Atomos recorders already support the new format, as does the pro-level DJI Inspire 2 drone

  • At import, you can have Final Cut Pro X create optimized media (in Apple ProRes format) and analyze it for stabilization issues, as well as color balance and the presence of people. If you've chosen to analyze the clips, the program can create Smart Collections based on type of shot (long, close, or medium) or whether the shot is stable or unstable. In my quick test, it created a People folder, with Group, Medium Shot, and Wide Shot Smart Collections below it, and a Stabilization folder with Excessive Shake and Steady Shot groups.

  • Final Cut Pro X can now import (and export) both projects and events in XML format. This means professional video editors can round-trip their work between video editing software and tools like Blackmagic Design's DaVinci Resolve, a standard in pro video color correction. The same holds for organizing projects in Square Box System's CatDV, which lets teams of professionals organize clips. On the other end of the spectrum, version 10.4 adds the ability to import iMovie on iOS projects, so you can start editing on an iPhone or iPad and continue in the more powerful desktop app.

  • You still can't directly open projects from Final Cut Pro 7 or earlier, but a plug-in called SendToX ($4.99 in the Mac App Store), from Intelligent Assistance lets you do just that—addressing a huge concern of the existing pro user base. Another workflow capability is support for Apple Xsan storage, with file locking so team members don't trip on each other's work. Premiere Pro, on the other hand, offers a bit more in the way of collaboration options with its Team Projects via Adobe Creative Cloud, which offers simultaneous editing with conflict resolution features.

  • In addition to its automatic clip-organization options, Final Cut Pro X includes manual keyword tagging. Much like a good photo workflow app, Final Cut Pro X makes entering frequently used tags simple—you can even use keyboard shortcuts. Tagging in Final Cut Pro X still isn't as sophisticated as the keywording feature in Adobe Lightroom, but Premiere can only use tags through the separate Adobe Bridge manager (though it does offer lots of metadata and face detection). One very cool keyword tagging option in Final Cut is that you can apply a tag to just part of a clip. You can also star, rate, or reject a clip from icons below the source tray. I'm always surprised at how many video editing apps lack this basic metadata capability.

  • Interface

  • The interface sports a consistent dark gray that makes the content you're editing the most prominent thing on the screen. Four preset window layouts in Final Cut include Default, Organize, Color & Effects, and Dual Displays (which is grayed out if you don't have dual displays). You can also create your own custom workspace layouts. You can't, however, undock panels to make them float free, as you can in Premiere Pro.

  • While the Final Cut Pro X timeline looks something like that of iMovie, with its free-form, trackless Magnetic Timeline view, the pro program packs vastly more editing power. As with pretty much every video editing app, Final Cut Pro X presents the standard three-pane view, with source clips on the top left, preview on the top right, and timeline across the bottom. A timecode indicator appears below the preview window, along with an indicator of rendering percent complete. You can full-screen the preview and resize any panel, but you can't pull panels off into separate windows (Corel VideoStudio Pro and Premiere Pro let you do this). You get Undo and Redo in Final Cut, but Premiere Pro's history window offers more in the way of letting you get back to any point in your editing process.

  • There are no track numbers along the left edge; Final Cut Pro X calls tracks lanes, and you can add as many of these as you like. There's no track limit like you find in other video editors such as Pinnacle Studio and CyberLink PowerDirector. I should note that Final Cut still makes excellent use of keyboard shortcuts, such as for changing back and forth among the trim, select, blade, and range selection functions. Good old J, K, L, I, and O still work as you'd expect. You can display an on-screen keyboard showing them all, and edit key functions to taste.

  • Adding clips to the Magnetic Timeline is a simple dragging operation, and your dropped clip snaps to neighbor clips or the start (you can use a Position cursor tool). If you're attentive, you'll notice a small hairline connects the clip you enter with the first clip you added. This Clip Connection means that whenever you move the main clip, the one added after will stay in the same relative position on the timeline. But if you drag a clip so that it overlaps another, that second clip scoots out of its way, dropping down to create a new overlapping lane beneath it.

  • Another concept unique to Final Cut Pro X is that clips are categorized into Roles. Roles define what clips are for—it could be video, titles, dialog, music, and effects. But the power of this comes when you create your own custom sub-roles, such as effects, dialogue, background, or B-roll. Clear color-coding of these roles means you can use the default colors or choose from a tasteful palette of a dozen colors to assign your own. Not only do these colors show up on the on-screen timeline, but also on the Touch Bar's mini timeline view, helping you see what kind of tracks are playing. It's great organizational tool.

  • Editing 360-Degree Video in Final Cut Pro X

  • Apple's new support for 360-degree VR video isn't just a gesture. It's deep, well-though-out support with the tools editors in this medium need, including true 360-degree titles, VR headset support, effects, and 360° Patch. The last is very useful for this kind of content: It lets you remove the camera rig from your production with a cloned area (usually the ground). Because 360 VR captures everything in every direction, the camera itself is not excluded, but often undesired in the final product.

  • After importing 360 content, you can view and navigate through it by dropping down the 360° Viewer option from the View menu. I tested with footage from a Nikon KeyMission 360 and a Samsung Gear 360 with no problems and snappy response. A couple things it doesn't do with 360, however, that CyberLink PowerDirector does, are stabilization and motion tracking.

  • Effects you can use on 360-degree content include variations of Blur, Glow, and Sharpen. If you have Apple Motion ($49), you can create custom 3D, 360-degree titles and motion graphics, but the base Final Cut includes a selection as well. When you're done editing, you can directly share to the biggest outlets for VR content these days: Facebook, YouTube, and Vimeo. Each of those has specific requirements that the program handles.

  • Editing Video on the Timeline

  • Final Cut offers precise, intuitive, and powerful tools for arranging and trimming clips. Trimming and splitting can be done in the timeline or right in the clip's iMovie-style source entry. You can easily mark any selections on a clip as Favorite, for later use. Double-clicking a clip brings up the Precision Editor. You can trim either end with a simple click-and-drag, and, if you change your mind, the trimmed-away part of the clip will still be there if you later drag back the other way. A Blade tool does what makes sense for a tool with that name: It splits the clip in two at the edit point.

  • I also like the Region Selection tool, which lets you mark in and out points to select part of a clip, which you can remove or edit further. I do, however, miss PowerDirector's multi-trim tool, which lets you mark multiple in and out points to remove undesirable bits in the middle of a clip in a simpler process. Still, Final Cut Pro X does let you do this kind of multiple sub-clip selection in the source panel. It also lets you easily make ripple, trim, roll, slip, and slide edits. The edits are nondestructive, and you can always restore a part of a clip after you trim it.

  • One of Final Cut Pro X's key features, Compound Clips, lets you group together clips, audio, and effects so that you can move them as a unit and everything will stay in sync. This really unclutters the timeline, by showing just a single clip for the compound. You can easily expand the Compound clip at any time for further tweaking, separating it into its component elements—nothing is permanently flattened or joined in the compounding process. It's a handy way to deal with complex combinations of elements.

  • Another clever innovation that lets you save space on the timeline is Auditions. When you drag a new clip on top of one already in the timeline, you get the option of adding it as an Audition. This puts a little spotlight icon in the clip entry, which, when clicked, opens a viewer/chooser for as many Audition clip options as you've added.

  • Think of it this way: Say you shot five takes for an opening scene for your wedding video. This little Auditions viewer lets you create a simple way to line up comparisons of all your choices. Just open the Audition window, select a track, and then play the overall video with the auditioning clip in place. Change clips and repeat until you see which one works better with your overall production. It's very cool.

  • Effects

  • Once your clips are all in place, you can fine-tune and bling them with Final Cut's rich collection of color tools, transitions, effects, and text tools. For starters, you get 149 customizable video effects and 109 audio effects. Quite a few third-party plug-ins are also now available for Final Cut. I installed Noise Industries' FxFactory Pro in my testing. Once installed, it looks just like part of the program, with its choices appearing in the Effects panel, rather than requiring its own window as some plug-in interfaces in other products do.

  • Final Cut comes with over 100 transitions of its own, and the ability to search by transition name is helpful, given how many choices there are. Adding the most commonly needed type, cross-dissolve—can be done with a keyboard shortcut. Transitions are easy to add—instead of having to create a secondary story line yourself, there's a one-step transition insertion for connected clips. Both effects and transitions are of high quality. You can set default video and audio effects that you can summon with a single keyboard combo, and save custom effects as presets.

  • The Flow transition is a great tool when your editing jump cuts. This makes those edits for removing slips of the tongue in interviews much smoother. I tested this on footage of an interview with our mobile guru, Sascha Segan, and the result was remarkable. Even though I cut out several words in the middle of a sentence, the Flow tool made the cut invisible. His head showed no motion at all, even though he had moved slightly in the part I cut out. The Flow tool simply filled in the missing bits, smoothing over the gap. This is an impressive tool.

  • In my testing, I found it easy to crop, rotate, resize, move, and do 3D skews on clips right in the preview window using handles. Composite picture-in-picture effects didn't slow down playback, as you see in some other video editing software, such as Pinnacle Studio.

  • Color

  • Final Cut does wonders with color correction. You can either have the app automatically balance color, saturation, and exposure, or use the Color Adjustment panel to manually adjust them. The panel has a color picker to set a clip's color values, saturation, and exposure, each of which you can apply separately to shadows, mid-tones, highlights, or everything.

  • New for version 10.4 are the updated Color Wheels. These have a puck in the middle that lets you move an image towards green, blue, or red, showing the result on the side of the wheel. You can also adjust brightness and saturation with the wheels, and separately control everything (with the Master wheel), or just shadows, midtones, or highlights. It's a remarkably powerful and intuitive set of tools, and more usable than Adobe Premiere Pro's equivalent color wheel tools. If Final Cut's wheels are not to your taste, the Color Board shows a linear view of your color settings.

  • The color scopes now adapt to HDR editing, as do the color editing tools. Supported formats include Rec. 2020 HLG and Rec. 2020 PQ for HDR10 output.

  • To get even deeper into the weeds of color correction, the new Color Curves tool lets you use multiple control points to adjust each of the three primary colors for very specific points on the brightness scale. Luma, Vectorscope, and RGB Parade monitors give you incredible insight into your movie's color usage. You can even edit a single color value using a dropper. Final Cut now supports Color LUTs (lookup tables) from camera manufacturers like ARRI, Canon, Red, and Sony, but also custom LUTs for effects. These effects can be combined with others in a stacked arrangement.

  • The Match Color feature lets you transfer color and exposure characteristics from one clip to the rest to give your project a consistent look and adjust specific areas of the image based on selected color or a mask. The Color Balance tool, according to Apple, can "increase contrast and remove color casts while making skin tones appear more natural." I didn't find that either tool made impressive changes in my testing, so I often headed to the Color Correction tools to adjust manually.

  • MacBook Pro Touch Bar Editing Support

  • A feather in Final Cut Pro X's cap is its support for the MacBook Pro with Touch Bar. The Touch Bar changes its appearance based on what you're doing in the application. It's nifty to see your timeline tracks or color options on the Touch Bar. Below, you can see three Touch Bar displays, for basic editing, timeline scrubbing, and text customization. These and many other versions of the Touch Bar show up automatically to expose tools that might be otherwise hidden in the menu. It's a great tool for beginners.

  • It might also be a good tool for higher-end users, too, but I can't help wonder if long-time Final Cut editors might be resistant to it. The biggest issue is that when you're working on a project, your eyes are intensely focused on the screen, not on the keyboard. And most video editors have the basic editing keyboard shortcuts in muscle memory by this point, so moving your gaze from the video content down to the keyboard introduces a disconnect in your workflow. Still, it's a good optional tool.

  • If you just want to be able to scrub through a video with your finger, you could do this in Adobe Premiere Elements on a Windows 10 touch-capable display without taking your eyes off the screen. Yes, the Touch Bar is close to the screen, but I find that while I'm looking at that bright, beautiful display, I'm usually not even aware of what's on the Touch Bar. Of course, if I worked with it long enough, that would probably change.

  • If you think of it as an additional option rather than an essential part of the Final Cut interface, there's really no downside to Final Cut's support for it. For those who don't have deeply ingrained habits—or who are willing to make new ones—the Touch Bar might end up being highly efficient and useful.

  • Titling and Captions

  • Titling is also simple and powerful in the latest version of Final Cut. You get lots of control over title overlays, with 183 animation templates. You edit text and position, and size the titles right in the video preview; there's no need for an external title editor. Though Final Cut Pro X has no instant movie feature like those you find in most consumer video editors, it does offer Themes, which are really just pairings of transitions and titles that work well together.

  • Final Cut's 3D Titles are a lot of fun. There are eight basic 3D templates and four more Cinematic ones, including a cool 3D Earth choice, for your sci-fi projects. There are 20 font presets, but you can use any style and size you like. Materials like concrete, fabric, plastic, and so on can give your titles any texture you desire. You also get a bunch of lighting options, such as Above, Diagonal Right, and so on.

  • For maximum control, you can edit the 3D titles in Motion, Apple's $49.99 ancillary 3D animation editor. Extrude 2D titles into 3D by tapping the 3D Text option in the Text Inspector. You can then position and rotate the text to taste on three axes. Even messing with 3D to this extent requires a powerful compute. I found myself looking at the pinwheel and dropping frames in playback on my test 21.5-inch iMac with a 3.1GHz Core i7 CPU and 16GB of RAM.

  • Touch Bar controls facilitate changing font settings like size and color, for those editing on a new MacBook Pro.

  • In the 10.4.1 update, Apple added deep, pro-level captioning capability to Final Cut. You can import standard CEA-608 and iTT caption files, which sync with your movie. You can also preview them in the video preview window, as well as position and format them with a choice of colors. On export, you can embed the captions into the video file or include them in a separate sidecar file. You can also send captioned projects to Compressor, which can make them iTunes Store–ready.

  • Chroma-Keying

  • Final Cut Pro X's chroma-keying effect works better than that of any Windows video editor I've used, performing admirably in testing, even given some imperfect green-screen lighting in the source. My background was nearly perfectly removed for transparency. Though Premiere Pro offers more adjustment choices with its Chroma-Key effect, I couldn't tune all its adjustments to get as good a result as Final Cut delivered off the bat. And, in any case, Final Cut offers more control, letting you refine the sample color, edges, strength, spill level, mix, and more. But it's the Color Selection tool that really makes Final Cut state of the art in chroma-key. This presents a color wheel with the matted color range, letting you visually adjust it to include more or less of a color range.

  • Getting the Sound Right

  • Audio editing is another strength of Final Cut Pro X. It can automatically fix hum, noise, and peaks, or you can manually adjust these, if you prefer. Over 1,300 royalty-free sound effects are included, and there's lots of plug-in support. One impressive trick is the ability to match separately recorded tracks; for example, if you shoot HD footage with a DSLR and record sound simultaneously on another recorder, Match Audio aligns the sound source. New support for Apple Logic Pro plug-ins give you even more powerful sound editing options. Finally, you get a surround-sound mixer to locate or animate 5.1 audio, and a 10-band or 31-band equalizer.

  • Multicam Editing

  • Final Cut Pro's multicam support reimagines the standard tool making it both more powerful and simpler. It supports the traditional syncing method using time codes, but it can also automatically sync up multiple clips by analyzing their audio tracks for peaks. You can alternatively use camera time or place a marker on the clips for syncing. Multicam works with sources in different formats, including different resolutions and codecs, and, remarkably, it allows up to 64 camera angles.

  • I mentioned ease of use, and you get this right from the start when working with multicam. Just select the clips to include (you can add or remove clips later), choose "New multicam clip…" from the right-click or File menu, and choose a syncing method. After placing the multicam clip in your timeline, choosing Open in Angle Editor displays a grid previewing each angle—up to 4-by-4 tiles for 16 total angles at a time.

  • As with many Mac operations, using multicam is simple—as long as you know what you're doing. It took me a while to figure out that I could cut angles only when a multicam clip was in the Timeline, using the Angle Viewer—not the Angle Editor, which lets you add or remove clips (or stills) to and from the multicam clip, resync them, and edit the component clips (trimming and so on). It's actually simpler than Premiere Pro's multicam workflow, but not as easy as purely consumer products like PowerDirector and Pinnacle Studio make it.

  • Not only does Final Cut's Angle Viewer let you switch angles live, but it also lets you later tweak the cuts in the timeline. This combination of live switching and timeline tweaking lets you turn a three-angle interview into something far more compelling than a single edited clip could be. Newer options let you edit audio separately and even combine multiple audio channels from the angles.

  • Export Options and Hardware Connections

  • Final Cut Pro X exports to the common output file formats, but pros will probably want the greater transcoding control available in the companion app, Compressor ($49.99). Final Cut can also output for Apple devices, discs, the Web, and email. As of the 10.4.1 update, you can share Roles separately, so, for example, you may only want to export video but not background music.

  •  

  • Five DVD and five Blu-ray menu themes are included, though you can change the background and logo—far less customization than you find in most consumer video apps. With Compressor, you can add chapters and names, something not available in Final Cut Pro X. If your real aim is output to disc, though, you may be better off with Adobe Premiere Elements or a PC app like PowerDirector or Corel VideoStudio.

  • Like consumer apps, however, Final Cut Pro X can share your movie directly to Facebook, Vimeo, and YouTube. For Vimeo and YouTube, 4K export is supported, too, and there are now 4K presets for exporting to Apple devices. It now also supports 360-degree uploading to all three. When I shared a short video by email, the result played nicely in the inbox. Finally, an HTTP streaming option lets content creators send their creations to Web servers for playback on iOS devices and Web browsers. Bandwidth is automatically adjusted for connection speed.

  • Final Cut Pro X supports external broadcast monitors. In addition to supporting the popular Black Magic and AJA cards connected to a broadcast monitor, Final Cut can connect to any HDMI screen, or to a display using the lightning-fast Thunderbolt interface. Black Magic, AJA, and Matrox offer Thunderbolt devices, which means you can preview on broadcast monitors in the field using a MacBook Pro as well as an iMac. Another, perhaps even more important, consequence of Thunderbolt is that it drastically reduces the time needed to transfer video from source devices.

  • Performance

  • Under the hood, the program's code base takes full advantage of 64-bit and multi-core processing, which eliminates a lot of waiting. This is a major deal for such a processing- and memory-intensive activity as video manipulation and encoding. Final Cut Pro 7 was 32-bit, meaning you couldn't take advantage of more than 4GB RAM. Thanks to support for the multiple cores found all recent Macs (particularly the ultrapowerful iMac Pro), the app processes everything you do in the background, and even displays percent complete in a timer-style indicator, so you can keep working.

  • Indeed, even on the lower-end MacBook, editing response was nearly instantaneous. My stress test of compositing four video tracks has brought many a video app to its knees in the past with stop-and-go playback. But when I tried the test with Final Cut Pro X running on the iMac, it ran smoothly after an initial short delay. The MacBook Pro did everything snappily except for (understandably) a very large import. This version was free of any program crashes I'd experienced in previous versions, a positive development indeed.

  • The Final Word on Final Cut

  • For video enthusiasts on the Mac, Final Cut used to be a daunting upgrade from iMovie. Final Cut Pro X changes all that, making for a smooth learning curve. For most pro users, the gains in Final Cut Pro X should outweigh the hurdles to adoption. Final Cut Pro X offers loads of power, ease of use, and no-wait performance. With rich support for 360 VR content editing and broader color spaces, Final Cut Pro X is ready for the future. Its deep, nimble tools in a fluid, highly usable and precise interface keep Final Cut Pro X our Editors' Choice for high-end video editing on the Mac.

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Apple MacPro Workstation

  • Standing at just 25 cm tall and weighing 5kg, the Mac Pro’s design, beautiful as it may be, completely redefines Apple’s ultimate Pro machine. It comes with the same amount of internal flash storage as a laptop and no available PCI slots for video capture cards, RAID cards, or the like. The new Mac Pro is really meant to be configured at the time of purchase, with any additional storage or cards added externally through the six Thunderbolt 2 ports or four USB 3.0 ports. The new Mac Pro also comes with dual gigabit ethernet ports and 802.11AC wireless networking.
     

  • In terms of overall performance, the 6-core Mac Pro was an impressive 65 percent faster that the previous high-end stock Mac Pro, the 2012 12-core Mac Pro with two 6-core Intel Xeon processors running at 2.4GHz. The new Mac Pro was faster in every test except the Cinebench CPU test, which was 10 percent faster on the 12-core system. The file copy test was more than 4 times as fast on the new Mac Pro’s PCI-connected flash storage than on the 12-core system’s 7200 rpm drives. PCMark Office tests were twice as fast on the new stock Mac Pro and graphics tests showed the dual AMD FirePro D500 GPUs in the new Mac Pro pushing twice as many frames per second in the Heaven graphics benchmark at 1280 by 720 resolutions than the 12-core Mac Pro with its Radeon HD 5770 graphics. Cranking the resolution to 2560 by 1600, the new Mac Pro was able to display 10 times as many frames per second as the 2012 Mac Pro.
     

  • The Mac Pro was much faster at Final Cut Pro import and rendering, as well as Photoshop, especially the OpenCL action script, and also MathematicaMark and Cinebench CPU tests.
     

  • Compact and quiet despite a huge helping of horsepower, the Mac Pro’s revolutionary design is set to turn the workstation market on its head. When Apple puts its mind to a task, it’s a safe bet that the end product will be something special – but the new Mac Pro is out of this world.
     

  • After years of research and design work at Apple’s labs, what has emerged is radically different from any desktop PC – a high-end workstation system, crammed with cutting-edge components, which looks more like a beautiful hi-tech bin than a computer.

    In keeping with Apple’s wider design ethos, the Mac Pro is a minimalist affair. Its unusual cylindrical shape, finished in a dark, polished gunmetal grey, is blemished by not a single mark – not even an Apple logo – until you reach the “rear” of the device, where all the connections are elegantly arranged on a single panel.

    Even this has been meticulously designed, with all Thunderbolt, USB and Ethernet ports stacked in two columns. Cleverly, the labels and lines surrounding each individual group are backlit, illuminating when the system fires up, or whenever movement is detected. If you happen to have your Mac Pro stowed under a desk, those backlit labels make it easier to locate the port you’re looking for.

    The Mac Pro’s big party trick is how easy it is to open up. Flip the single catch at the top of the chassis next to the port panel, and (assuming all cables have been disconnected) it’s possible to pull the entire exterior sheath up and off, with a satisfying, Star Trek-esque whoosh. It reveals a suitably exotic interior, with four RAM sockets sitting in two spring-loaded banks on either side, and the rear of the two graphics cards between them, one of which has the system’s single PCI Express-based SSD mounted on it.

     

  • Internal design
    The Mac Pro is certainly eye-catching, but what’s really clever about the design is the way that Apple has completely deconstructed the traditional desktop. Instead of everything sprouting from a single, monolithic motherboard, Apple has opted for a modular approach, with each major component mounted on a separate board.

    This explains how Apple has crammed so much into so little space (it really is compact, rising a mere 251mm from the desk and measuring 167mm in diameter). What it doesn’t explain, though, is how the Mac Pro gets rid of the heat generated by all of its powerful components.

    In more traditional high-end workstations and PCs, there’s usually an assortment of fans and heatsinks, all working together to cool the system. They draw air into the chassis, distribute it to the graphics cards, CPU, power supply and other components, and push it back out of the box again. Inevitably, under load, such an arrangement can make a lot of noise. The smaller the chassis, the harder those fans have to work, and the louder they become.

    In the comparatively tiny Mac Pro, the main heat-generating parts – the CPU and graphics cards – are attached to a single, Toblerone-shaped heatsink that runs up the centre of the tubular case, with one component on each side. Apple calls this the “thermal core”, and it requires only a single fan to keep things cool, which is mounted at the bottom of the heatsink. This sucks air in from outside, pushes it across the surface of the heatsink and vents it out of the hole you see at the top.


    Bottom line

  • The new Mac Pro redefines Apple’s highest-end system. Lacking the internal expansion that once drew advanced hobbyists to the line, the new Mac Pro is truly a workstation-class computer designed to shave minutes and hours off projects that wedding video production pros run day-in and day-out.

 
 
 

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Multi Camera setups

  • We are experienced with many different camera set up suitable for Interviews, Concerts, Panel discussions and Theatre layouts as well as a complete portable studio that includes lighting, external audio equipment and multiple cameras. We are equipped for both outdoor and indoor filming. We are fully insured for public liability with Aon Insurance.

  • The two Sony cameras set up for a concert:

  • Theatre set up 2 x cameras with Sound desk:

  • Portable Studio for Panel discussion:

 

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Manfrotto Tripod

290 XTRA Kit with video head

  • The new Manfrotto 290 Xtra is the perfect solution in terms of stability for hobbyist birdwatchers and digiscoping.
    The Manfrotto 290 Xtra is a 3-section tripod, the biggest in the 290 range, with aluminum leg tubes and special top casting enhancing rigidity, durability and performance. Its aluminum leg-locking levers are tension-adjustable, so they can be tightened to counteract any effects of aging and wear, keeping the tripod fully functional throughout its long lifespan.

  • This tripod’s key feature is its choice of four leg angle positions which maximize shooting creativity. Its rapid center column adds flexibility and extends the min-max height range. A new rubber legwarmer guarantees comfortable grip and maximum ergonomics. The tripod comes with a dedicated shoulder bag ensuring comfortable portability at all times.
    The 290 Xtra comes in a kit with a lightweight aluminum fluid head with pan bar and quick release plate complete with secondary security. It features smooth, fluid movement, pan and tilt locks. This head is ideal for cameras up to 4 kg in weight.

 

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Zhiyun Smooth 4 with Filmic Pro

The Zhiyun Smooth 4 is easily the most ambitious mobile gimbal on the market.

Where other brands keep things simple, the Smooth 4 offers tons of buttons and features. It even has a zoom/focus wheel which can only be found elsewhere on more professional camera gimbals. The hardware is second to none.Then add -  Filmic Pro.

It’s the best mobile filmmaking app on the planet. Filmic Pro is award winning, and it’s the absolute best solution to give you complete control over your mobile phone’s camera.

So now we have this match made in heaven: the Smooth 4, with buttons and dials begging to be properly utilised, and an epic piece of software to control it with. 

The combination allows shooting in 4k and the use of the zoom wheel all in the same app. 

The buttons work amazingly. You can control the interface using the Smooth 4 buttons without ever really needing to touch the screen. This is particularly handy in bright conditions, and it cuts down on those annoying finger marks too.

This is a classic example of two tech giants playing to their strengths. It really is a nerdy match made in heaven.